international relations

2017- A Year in Review: Coral Bell School of Asia Pacific Affairs

The aspirations and approach of Bell School show a strong focus on research excellence, collegiality, award-winning teaching, and consistent policy impact and engagement in the Asia-Pacific.

Performing Unity: The symbol and ritual of ASEAN

In his latest book project, Mathew Davies argues that, at its core, the Association of Southeast Asian Nations is really just one big performance.

Comic Relief: Unpacking the politics of pop culture

In his newly designed course for international relations students, Alister Wedderburn is bringing culture back to the fore.

Regional roundup spotlights Australia’s key relationships

Speaking at the Australian National University’s annual Australia 360 event last Tuesday, a panel of academics broke down Australia’s key regional relationships, starting in Southeast Asia.

Acting Like a State: Non-European Membership of International Organizations in the Nineteenth Century

Ellen Ravndal, ‘Acting Like a State: Non-European Membership of International Organizations in the Nineteenth Century’, in Jens Bartelson, Martin Hall and Jan Teorell, eds, De-Centering State M

Trygve Lie (1946-1953)

Ellen Ravndal, ‘Trygve Lie (1946-1953)’, in Manuel Fröhlich and Abiodun Williams, eds, The UN Secretary-General and the Security Council: A Dynamic Relationship (Oxford: Oxford University

The Case for Institutional Pacifism

Pacifism, in its most familiar form, is the view that waging war is never morally justified—call this the pacifism-of-acts. This is to be carefully distinguished from what we might call the pacifism-of-institutions. The latter position is not characterised by an absolute objection to waging war with the military resources that we have amassed. It is characterised, rather, by an objection to the amassing of those resources to begin with.

R2P and the Prevention of Mass Atrocities: A Child-Centric Approach

Cecilia Jacob, ‘R2P and the Prevention of Mass Atrocities: A Child-Centric Approach’, Global Responsibility to Protect, 10(1-2) 2018: 75-96.

Testing the Nuclear Stability-Instability Paradox Using Synthetic Control Method

Does acquisition of nuclear weapons by security rivals increase their level of conventional militarised conflict? Some recent theoretical and quantitative work has supported the ‘stability-instability paradox’, the proposition that while nuclear weapons deter nuclear war, they may also provide the conditions for nuclear-armed rivals to increase conventional military conflict with each other. However, other quantitative analysis and qualitative studies of the India–Pakistan dyad have delivered more equivocal assessments.

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Updated:  23 March 2016/Responsible Officer:  Su-Ann Tan/Page Contact:  CAP Web Team