Australia

Why Turnbull's Asian summit trip was a missed opportunity

Malcolm Turnbull's efforts at APEC and the East Asia Summit went some way towards achieving three foreign policy aims, but failed at a potential fourth, writes Dr Matt Davies

Out of order

Australian Foreign Minister Julie Bishop's call for ASEAN to defend the international rules-based order is desirable, but is it realistic, questions Mathew Davies.

Trump and strategic change in Asia

Dr William Tow argues that President Trump’s ‘America first’ posture does not necessarily mean ‘Asia last’

ANU graduates rated Australia's most employable

Graduates from The Australian National University (ANU) have been rated as Australia's most employable graduates and among the most sought after by employers worldwide.

China, Australia and the US rebalance?

Feng Zhang questions whether the current, relatively uneventful security relationship between Australia and China can last under changing circumstances. (Image: Department of Defence)

Debating the Quad

In this Centre of Gravity paper, six of Australia’s leading scholars and policy experts debate Australian participation in the ‘Australia-India-Japan-United States consultations on the Indo-Pacific

Australia-Japan defence deal: Noteworthy, not newsworthy

Don't hold the front page! Japan and Australia adopt a 'strategic holding pattern', writes Dr David Envall

An unfolding humanitarian emergency

The closure of the immigration detention facility on Manus Island has left hundreds of people without basic shelter needs, writes Dr Alister Wedderburn

Does Australia Really Want a Rules-Based International Order?

This seminar will enquire into the notable shift in rhetoric on the part of the Australian government from that of support for ‘international law’ to that of support for a ‘rules-based international order’. It will identify possible reasons for the change in language, including the difficulty of negotiating new multilateral treaties due to a shifting global distribution of power. It will then enquire into the possible implications, if any, of the change.

Time for a shield wall?

Turning to a ballistic missile defence system as a way of protecting Australia from a North Korean attack is a bad idea that should never get off the ground, Benjamin Zala writes.

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Updated:  23 March 2016/Responsible Officer:  Su-Ann Tan/Page Contact:  CAP Web Team