Replenishing Bodies and the Political Economy of SRHR in Crises and Emergencies

Gender, Global Health, and Violence: Feminist Perspectives on Peace and Disease

Author/s (editor/s):

Maria Tanyag

Publication year:

2019

Publication type:

Book chapter

Find this publication at:
Rowman & Littlefield

Maria Tanyag, ‘Replenishing Bodies and the Political Economy of SRHR in Crises and Emergencies’, in Tiina Vaittenen and Catia Confortini, eds, Gender, Global Health, and Violence: Feminist Perspectives on Peace and Disease, London: Rowman & Littlefield, 2019, pp. 25-46.

In this chapter I argue that an invisible cost of crises is in how women and girls bear compounded harms directly through their distinct sexual and reproductive health needs, and indirectly by mitigating rising care demands in their households and communities. These compounded harms reveal why and how women and girls may experience excess mortality – that is, mortality beyond what might be expected across a population – during and after crises and emergencies. Through a feminist political economy analysis of sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR), I demonstrate the continuum of violence between gender-based violence occurring in times of crisis on the one hand, and the everyday gendered insecurities rooted in structural and symbolic violence embodied by restrictions to SRHR on the other.

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