Religion, Faith and Global Politics

Keynotes 06

Author/s (editor/s):

Lorraine Elliott, Mark Beeson, Shahram Akbarzadeh, Greg Fealy, Stuart Harris

Publication year:

2006

Publication type:

Keynotes

'Religion, Faith and Global Politics', Keynotes 06, Canberra: Department of International Relations, Research School of Pacific and Asian Studies, The Australian National University, July 2006.

Religion and the resurgence of faith-based foreign policies, and the diplomatic and security challenges that this is perceived to present, have become a central theme in contemporary world politics. Interest in this topic has been motivated by what appears to be a growing religiosity in the public pronouncements of at least some leaders of state and by the actions, including acts of extreme violence, of non-state actors in which calls for faith-based political practice feature prominently. In a series of short essays, the authors of this Keynote investigate the main features of this resurgence and put to the test some of the assumptions about religion and foreign policy that feature in public debate. They caution us to be aware of often-overlooked political and normative complexities of the relationship between religion, faith and international politics.

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