Haroro J. Ingram

Dr Haroro J. Ingram

Research Fellow
Contact details
+61 2 6125 2171
Room: 2.23
Building: Hedley Bull Building
Haroro Ingram

Dr Haroro J. Ingram is a research fellow in the Department of International Relations, the Coral Bell School of Asia Pacific Affairs, at the Australian National University (Canberra). His primary postdoctoral research project analyses the role of propaganda in the strategies of violent non-state political movements with Islamic State and the Afghan Taliban as major case studies. This three-year project is funded by the Australian Research Council under its Discovery Early Career Researcher Award (DECRA). As a research associate with the International Centre for Counter-Terrorism (ICCT, The Hague), Ingram is working on the Counter-terrorism Strategic Communications (CTSC) Project team and has authored or co-authored several articles on a range of topics related to how best to understand and counter extremist propaganda.

Ingram’s research draws heavily on primary source materials, most of which is collected during periods of fieldwork in South Asia (Afghanistan) and the Middle East (Iraq). He has interviewed civilians as well as current and former activists and fighters from Afghanistan, Iraq, Chechnya and Syria. His field research has also included interviews with current and former counterinsurgency and counter-terrorism operatives. Ingram is currently a research associate with the International Centre for Counter-terrorism (ICCT) in The Hague and a Visiting Fellow with the Naval Postgraduate School’s Defense Analysis Department (Monterey, California). Prior to accepting his current role with the Australian National University, Ingram worked in a variety of national security roles.

Counter-Terrorism Strategic Communications (CTSC) Project - The Hague

The Counter-Terrorism Strategic Communications (CTSC) Project, led by the International Centre for Counter-Terrorism (ICCT) in The Hague, is a collaborative project bringing together experts from Europe, USA and Australia as well as researchers from the Middle East and South Asia. It was set up to tackle one of the most significant national and global security challenges facing the world today: how to understand and confront the propaganda messaging of violent extremists like Al-Qaeda and the so-called Islamic State. Through empirical research, based largely on primary source materials and in-country fieldwork, the project aims to test assumptions and evaluate past campaigns in order to develop key principles and guidelines for counter-terrorism strategic communications efforts.

Through Their Eyes [DE140101123] - Australia, US, Afghanistan, Iraq

This postdoctoral research project analyses the role of propaganda in the campaign strategies of violent non-state political actors with Islamic State and the Afghan Taliban as major case studies. It is funded by the Australian Research Council’s Discovery Early Careerer Researcher Award (DECRA).

Teaching

Haroro teaches the undergraduate course Peace & Conflict Studies POLS2123 (Semester 2, 2017).

Haroro Ingram at the ANU Info Wars Conference

Talking down terror

Global leaders need to rethink the way they talk about terrorism.

Image: Flickr munksynz

Why ISIS is so good at branding its failures as successes

When you think about terrorist attacks the way the Islamic State does, even blatant technical failure can become strategic success.

Photo by Reuters

What Happens When ISIS Becomes an Online Caliphate?

No longer merely against the ropes, the Islamic State is on the canvas.

Image source: Jonathan Ernst/Reuters

The Yemen raid and the ghost of Anwar al-Awlaki

President Donald Trump has begun forging his own legacy in the ongoing wars on terror.

Updated:  23 March 2016/Responsible Officer:  Su-Ann Tan/Page Contact:  CAP Web Team